Other posts related to leonardo-da-vinci

 | March 20, 2012 11:18 am

I saw this quote on Fountly and quite liked it:

"Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff. Most fails. Some works. You do more of what works. If it works big, others quickly copy it. Then you do something else. The trick is the doing something else."

It’s attributed to Leonardo Da Vinci.*

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* I’m highly skeptical of this attribution and want to see a reference. Even better would be to see the quote in context. Most of Leonardo’s words of wisdom come via his notebooks, and that’s not usually how he wrote things in his notebooks. For the open source writing book, I’ve spent a fair amount of time with the notebook translations, and this just doesn’t sound like Leo. Mostly because Leo didn’t seem to be that concerned with others copying him. He enjoyed being emulated. With all that said, I still like the quote. (Even though it is an error to map modern sensibilities onto our ancient role models.)

 | August 26, 2010 8:13 pm

D'Medici Family Coat of ArmsFor the past few weeks, I’ve been working my way through a book called “Cartographies of Time.”  I’m only about a third of the way through it so far, but it is a fabulous book that both deserves (and shall get) its own post and a proper review.  (Maybe even a whole series.)

But while I am not quite ready to dive into that project, there is one aspect of Cartographies of Time that meshes really well with other things I’ve been thinking about.

In particular, I’ve been really interested in the book’s discussion of the methods used for understanding and recording knowledge. Even more interesting is the ways in which these techniques have evolved through time.  (For a book that claims to primarily be a history of the timeline, Cartographies does a magnificent job of covering many tools: lists, maps, charts, trees and graphs.)

As I’ve read, I’ve found myself enthralled to one particular question, namely: the records you keep and share seem to be uniquely connected to your mindset (a complex amalgam of education, experience, and circumstance), environment, and culture (particularly important is the effect of language).  As these things evolve, the substance of your thinking (and therefore your records and how you express them) also change in divers ways.

Given a rich intellectual and cultural environment, they can flower and spread.  In a barren landscape, the mode and presentation of thought can remain static for centuries.

Show me more… »

 | February 5, 2010 12:31 am

DaVinci - HandsWhen I graduated from college and had to choose between a career in industry or academics, I found it to be an easy decision: I stayed in academics.  I like to have my head in the clouds and enjoy the intellectual lifestyle.  (I actually consider the label of “absentminded” to be a compliment.)

It should come as no surprise, then, that one of the most enjoyable aspects of writing a book has been the opportunity to research my subject.  My reading list has included books on analytic design, illustration, anatomy, typesetting, scientific communication, web technologies, LaTeX, the history of science, statistics and informational graphics. And as I worked my way through it, I took some extremely interesting side trips.  One of the most intriguing, however, was an extended tangent through the notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci.

Da Vinci died in the year 1519, nearly five hundred years ago.  Yet, the modern world remains fascinated by him.  His name adorns the side of best selling books and conspiracy fiction; and his drawings have become cultural icons.  As an example of his popularity:

In October of 2009, Martin Kemp, a professor of art and history at the University of Oxford, found a portrait of an Italian girl.  Up until Kemp took an interest, it was widely accepted that portrait had been painted sometime in the nineteenth century by an unknown artist.   After a great deal of investigation and the use of a multispectral camera, however, Kemp discovered something startling.  The painting had actually been done by Leonardo and nearly overnight, it went from a value of 19,000  British pounds to over 100 million.

I’m no different than the masses.  Leonardo fascinates me.  He had a very distinctive way of seeing the world and an engaging style.  Maybe that’s why it’s so easy to lose yourself in the details of his work.  Given my interest, a thorough study of Leonardo’s notebooks seemed only natural.

What I didn’t foresee, however, is that I would start to digitally collect his sketches; and in the past several months, I’ve put together a rather eclectic mix from across the internets.  Earlier today, I realized that the images might be of interest to others as well; thus, I’ve created a special online gallery for them.  It can be found under “Art and Photography” –> “The DaVinci Notebooks”  To get there more quickly, you could also just click here.

Enjoy!

Update (2011-09-08): Due to problems with the Gallery 2 Plugin for WordPress, I have removed the Da Vinci Gallery. I will replace it with something else in the near future. For now, thought, the link is dead.