Other posts related to texmemo

 | August 2, 2010 2:31 pm

Presidential-SealFrom a structural standpoint, memos are interesting documents.  They share some attributes in common with a letter, and others in common with a structured report.  Because of this, LaTeX uses have historically used a document class meant for one of those documents when composing memos.  There isn’t anything wrong with that.  It’s very easy to begin a new “article” and then add the needed “To”, “From”, “Subject” and “Date” lines manually.

However, while this is easy, it still requires that you do a bit of “finger painting”.  As a (more or less) dedicated user of LaTeX, I dislike finger painting.  Quite a bit, actually.  It might even be accurate to say that I am philosophically opposed to finger painting.

The major advantage of using LaTeX is that, like XHTML and CSS, it can separate your content from the markup and formatting that determines its appearance.  When you fingerpaint, however, you mix them all together.  Your appearance syntax and the content of your document get inseparably intertwined.  In some cases, you couldn’t separate them even if you wanted to.  For that reason, finger painting is just wrong.  But even though finger paining in LaTeX may feel wrong, I’ve never had a reason to create a better solution.

That is, until a few a weeks ago.

Quite recently, I’ve become involved in a new project and because of what the project is and the need to official keep records of communication, I’ve found myself writing memos.  Lot’s of memos.  More memos than I’ve ever written at any other point in my life.  Moreover, I’m going to be writing (many) memos for the foreseeable future.  On Friday, after finishing (yet another) memo, I decided that it was time to create a more formal memo template/document class for LaTeX.

I’m calling it texMemo.

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