Other posts related to thunderbird

 | August 10, 2010 5:47 pm

ThunderbirdI’m a software whore.  I love to play with new programs and experiment with new features.  I think it’s exciting and interesting to try new stuff.

However, there is also a side-effect of my little liaisons.  Because I’m not faithful to any one program, I have very little loyalty to either operating systems or applications.  If there is something new and shiny, I’m going to play with it.

It also means that I get frustrated with limitations.  Because I move between different programs so frequently, there’s little incentive for me to stay with one over another; unless, that is, it works really well.

This is the reason that, about a year ago, I decided to move from Thunderbird (my email client at the time) to Evolution (an alternative that comes with the Gnome desktop).  At the time, I was frustrated with how Thunderbird handled schedules and calendars.

Local calendaring was more or less acceptable, but it was really hard to work with remote services such as Microsoft Exchange or Google Calendar.  The support could (at best) be called “experimental”.  Task and appointments didn’t update reliably, and it would only worked when you had a connection to the internet.  The net effect was that your calendar in Thunderbird wasn’t really able to talk to your cell phone.

Now, for some people, this might not be a big deal.  For me, however, it was an enormous problem and I simply could not find a workaround.  So, I left Thunderbird behind and decided to use Evolution instead.

For the past year, I’ve been very happy with Evolution.  After it’s been configured to have a unified inbox, Evolution is imminently useable.  It handles calendars, tasks, contacts and email; all the things that a collaboration program is supposed to do.  It might not have all of the bells and whistles of other clients like Thunderbird, Mail.app (Mac OS X) or Microsoft Outlook, but it works well and I’ve had few complaints.

Until the past few weeks, that is.

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